Words from Latin

Study Words

  1. inane
  2. relevant
  3. impetuous
  4. ambivalent
  5. dejected
  6. postmortem
  7. incriminate
  8. access
  9. plausible
  10. interrupt [1]
  11. alliteration
  12. refugee
  13. amicable
  14. lucid [2]
  15. percolate
  16. meticulous
  17. fastidious
  18. trajectory
  19. animosity
  20. implement
  21. ambiguity
  22. curriculum
  23. omnivorous
  24. bellicose
  25. electoral
  26. crescent [3]
  27. obsequious
  28. transect
  29. precipice
  30. susceptible
  31. condolences [4]
  32. benefactor
  33. candidate
  34. bugle
  35. formidable
  36. canary
  37. subterfuge
  38. abdicate
  39. lunatic
  40. carnivore [5]
  41. gregarious
  42. ostentatious
  43. prosaic [6]
  44. herbivore
  45. prodigal
  46. magnanimous
  47. benevolent
  48. mercurial
  49. simile
  50. jovial
  51. ridiculous
  52. innate
  53. obstinate
  54. discern
  55. mediocre
  56. insidious
  57. rupture
  58. precipitate
  59. erudite
  60. colloquial
  61. intractable
  62. exuberant [7]
  63. ingenious
  64. retrospective
  65. ominous
  66. vulnerable
  67. omnipotent
  68. consensus
  69. discipline
  70. alleviate
  71. spectrum
  72. prescription
  73. capitulation
  74. incredulous
  75. affinity
  76. necessary
  77. adjacent
  78. dissect
  79. conjecture
  80. imperative
  81. predicate
  82. corporal
  83. patina
  84. Capricorn
  85. participant
  86. library
  87. cognition
  88. primal
  89. filament
  90. unity
  91. ventilate
  92. aquatic
  93. igneous
  94. reptile
  95. providence
  96. message
  97. foliate
  98. nasal
  99. opera
  100. renovate
  101. credentials
  102. temporal
  103. canine
  104. measure
  105. credible
  106. femininity
  107. confidence
  108. triumvirate
  109. popularity
  110. diary
  111. humble
  112. vivisection
  113. strict
  114. prosecute
  115. contiguous
  116. ductile
  117. gradient
  118. current
  119. perfidy
  120. fidelity
  121. incorruptible

Challenge Words

  1. soliloquy
  2. accommodate
  3. pernicious [8]
  4. efficacy
  5. visceral
  6. exacerbate
  7. indigenous
  8. belligerent
  9. vernacular
  10. infinitesimal
  11. recalcitrant
  12. innocuous
  13. precocious
  14. ameliorate
  15. commensurate
  16. facetious
  17. prerogative
  18. ubiquitous
  19. egregious
  20. aggregate
  21. tertiary
  22. corpuscle
  23. perennial

Spelling Tips

  1. 1 One of the hardest things to remember about words from Latin is whether an internal consonant (like rr in interrupt) is doubled. To reinforce your memory of the correct spelling, try to remember related words all together (like interrupt along with interruption or necessary along with necessity).
  2. 2 The \\ sound (as in ooze) is nearly always spelled with u in words from Latin. It typically follows a \d\, \j\, \l\, \r\, or \s\ sound. After other consonants, this sound normally becomes \y\ (as in bugle, subterfuge, ambiguity, and prosecute and in one pronunciation of refugee).
  3. 3 Beware of words like crescent in which the \s\ sound is spelled with sc in words from Latin. Other examples include visceral, discern, discipline, susceptible, and corpuscle.
  4. 4 When you hear within a word from Latin the \s\ sound followed by any of the sounds of e (long, short, or schwa), there's a possibility that the \s\ sound is spelled with c as in exacerbate, access, adjacent, condolences, facetious, and necessary.
  5. 5 The letter i is a vowel often used to connect two Latin word elements. If the connecting vowel sound is a schwa (\ə\) and you must guess at the spelling of this sound, the letter i might be a good guess: See carnivore and herbivore. Other examples include non–study-list words that end in iform such as oviform and pediform.
  6. 6 The letter k rarely appears in words from Latin, and its sound is nearly always represented by c as in canary, prosaic, canine, mediocre, Capricorn, cognition, ductile, incorruptible, vernacular, innocuous, and many other words on the list.
  7. 7 The letter x often gets the pronunciation \gz\ in words from Latin (as in exacerbate and exuberant).
  8. 8 The combination ious ends many adjectives of Latin origin. When the consonant that precedes ious is c or t, the sound of the final syllable is \shəs\ as in facetious, ostentatious, pernicious, and precocious. It is important to keep in mind that several adjectives from Latin ending with this sound end in eous rather than ious. In such instances, the definitions of the words usually contain phrases such as "consisting of," "resembling," or "having the characteristic of." Examples include non–study–list words herbaceous, cetaceous, and lilaceous.